Addictive Behavior to Smart Phones

smartphones| addiction| behavior 

person holding phone and texting oudoors
Are you addicted to the way you interact with your smart phone or device? Find out more about why this matters to you, your health, and your relationships.

After reading Mel Robbin’s book, “The Five Second Rule”, I decided to check out her free 31 day online mentoring program offered to anyone who purchased her book. For me, the online mass coaching program, though generalized, is a great way for a new author to display the depth of her knowledge and the power of her research. I signed up, hit, “Submit,” and then I admit, I didn’t expect to be challenged.

Yet within the first seven days, Mel’s program had me at, “Put your cellphone away from your nightstand.” In essence, she had pointed out a significant flaw in my own behavioral routines and subroutines. Within a few hours, I was aware that I was more addicted to the way I had coded my own behavior around these fascinating devices. And that addicted behavior was controlling me more than I was controlling them.

Now, before you close this page because something in your brain is telling you that you don’t need to hear a message that may ask you to change something you don’t want to change, please do yourself a favor. Take a deep breath, call bullocks on your own Resistance, and keep reading to the very end.

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    Talking about Suicide

    Suicide | Suicide Prevention |Talking about Suicide
    Black and white background, man with head in his hands, crying
    We need to talk openly and honestly about suicide. Please check your triggers before reading this post. Image by Pixabay, free for commercial use image.

    The real truth about suicide is not that suicide rates are on the rise, but that it has been rising for some time now.  If people did not notice before, they are paying attention now.

    With the recent deaths by suicide of American designer Kate Spade and celebrity chef and culture journalist Anthony Bourdain, Social Media is gawking about why such apparently successful people would take their lives. Did they struggle with depression? Were there clues and signs given? And perhaps more important to those who live in fear that their loved ones will choose to take their own lives, could these suicides have been prevented?

    Because I believe in honest and non-judgmental talk about suicide, the following post is a balance between understanding the statistics around the 10th highest cause of death in the United States, the care that providers are bound to give by license, and the personal experiences of this therapist, with any incidences or persons anonymized and depersonalized to protect the privacy of others.

    Please check  your own triggers before reading the rest of this post.

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      Exposure Therapy: A Personal Experience with Fear

      Exposure Therapy | Self Help | Phobias | Fear

      Woman reaching out with right hand while swimming under the surface of a pool.
      Do you have a phobia that you have wondered if you can do without? Read about my experience with Exposure Therapy, and consider whether a self-guided plan or a structured and mediated plan could help you. Photo by Imei Hsu (2018).

      There is a type of phone call I receive at least a half dozen or more times a year. It sounds something like this:

      Caller: Hi, I’m calling about a problem I have, and wondering if you do this.”

      Me: Sure, what is the problem?

      Caller: Well, I feel kind of embarrassed to say this, but I am afraid of [insert fear]. I don’t even know what can be done about it.

      Me: OK, thank you for sharing what you are afraid of. Up to now, what have you done to address your fear of [insert fear] so far?

      Caller: Mostly, I just try to avoid it.

      Me: OK, how’s that working for you?

      Caller: [laughing] Obviously not too well if I’m calling you!

      Me: Fair enough!

      Caller: So, do you offer any help for this? Like, do you do some kind of desensitizing program?

      Me: Do you mean, Exposure Therapy?

      Caller: Yes.

      Me: That depends on the type of response and the type of phobia.

      After we get to that last sentence, everything afterwards is dependent on the type of phobia and the individual’s response to that phobia; everything else is generalized information that isn’t specific enough to be helpful. Over the course of my counseling practice, I’ve been able to help individuals confront specific phobias by creating in vivo and systematic desensitization scenarios, and watched phobic reactions decrease so that the former terror associated with those situations turns into a whisper.

      In other words, Exposure Therapy often works because I apply it to those who have the highest chances of responding well to it, and I don’t recommend it for those who have a low chance of a extinguishing that fear response using Exposure Therapy alone.

      To give you an idea of what Exposure Therapy is like, and why guided Exposure Therapy might be of help to you if you have a phobia that you’d like to seek treatment for, read on for my personal experiences with Exposure Therapy.

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